Things to do in the Garden this May


What to do in the garden NOW!

1. Pay attention to soil status when planting. Given all of the moisture lately, lots of beds will be difficult to plant until they dry out a bit. Clay soils, common along the front range will be very difficult to work – the soil will clump and if left in clumps will dry rock hard. Raised beds should drain more quickly.

2. Continue planting hardy and semi-hardy crops such as lettuces, carrots, beets, peas, etc. in succession until the middle of May.

3. Research your average last frost date using this link. Once you know that, you can begin scheduling classroom planting activities for warm season crops. Look at the longer range forecasts for the week of and hope for warm temps. Tender or warm season crops are ones such as tomatoes, corn, beans, eggplant, peppers, melons and cucumbers.

4. When planting heavy feeders like tomatoes, add, as directed, a balanced, organic fertilizer to the planting hole. Plant tomatoes deeply, up to the first set of leaves. The root hairs along the stem will develop into roots, forming a strong water/nutrient transport system.

5. Organize a system of summer maintenance for your garden.  Using Sign Up Genius is one option. Encourage families to be part of this communal effort called your school garden. For a large-ish garden, 2-3 families per week is necessary.

6. Contact the facilities staff at your school to see if they have an idea of when the irrigation will be turned on for the season.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Recent Posts

Beekeeping in the Burbs

Beekeeping in the Burbs I'm a mom to three young boys which means our days are full of lots of silliness, crazy energy, some screaming and of course, laughter. It also means that with all of the extra energy that three boys ages four, six, and eight, create, the very...

Getting Started with Native Plants

Getting Started with Native Plants The Colorado Native Plant Society hosts an annual conference early every spring, for which the keynote in 2022 was the great ecologist, Doug Tallamy. His presentation challenged what has become the status quo of talking about how...

Getting Your Garden Ready for Spring

Getting Your Garden Ready for Spring Though it can be hard to believe with all of the recent snow, the days are getting longer and warmer and it’s time to start preparing your garden for spring! Check Your SeedsIf you plan to start your garden from seeds, now is a...

Samples, Dumplings & Community

SAMPLES, DUMPLINGS & COMMUNITY I’ve never really wanted to leave the table. As a kid, I’d sit in the kitchen well after the dishes were dried and the lights were dimmed and finish my meal. There was always an adventure at the plate, and traveling slowly was the...

Rewarding Volunteer Experience

VOLUNTEERING IN LOCAL DENVER GARDENS MAKES FOR A FUN AND REWARDING MORNING There is an incredible feeling that comes from working with people in your community to accomplish a shared goal.  In this case, that goal is good, clean, and fair food for all.  Slow Food...

Increasing Food Access with Beverly Grant

R & B’s Mo’ Betta Green Marketplace is not your typical farmers market – it is an experience that caters to the five senses to bring health, eating, and active living to all. Beverly Grant is a community weaver and positive change maker in the Denver food scene....