Garden Planning and Planting for March

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March madness…. in the garden.

Come by the Slow Food Office to pick up seed packets. We still have some available! Below if your garden to do list:

  1. Clean out shed or storage container. Assess tool condition. Checkhoses.
  2. Based on the soil test already done, add soil amendments a few weeks before planting.
  3. Create a planning chart to organize planting and optimize yield. Consider Garden to Cafeteria and Youth Farm Stand program needs.
  4. If you haven’t already done so, start cool season crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts & cabbage indoors for transplant by the end of April.
  5. Direct sow in ground cool season (hardy) crops such as arugula, lettuce, spinach, peas, and kale beginning mid-March through the end of April.
  6. Start warm season crops (tender) such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant indoors at the end of the month for transplant mid-late May. Hold off on melons and squash until mid to end of April or they will get unmanageable and difficult to transplant.
  7. Two Ark of Taste seed potato varieties are available for pick up at the Slow Food office.  These can be planted now and throughout the spring.
  8. Large compressed blocks of potting soil, to be used for seedlings and transplants, are available at 4 Denver area schools – Morey Middle School, Steele Elementary, Cory Elementary and Franklin Elementary (LPS). They can be picked up at the gardens at your convenience.

*If you’re a gambler, hedge your bets and plant early. Precipitation increases in Denver during March. Snow will not hurt cool season crops. Remember, however, germination rates may be slowed with cold soil temps. Try warming the soil for quicker germination by laying thick black plastic several days before planting.

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